Happy National DNA Day 2017!

My celebration of National DNA Day and fascination with genetic DNA testing began with my first mitochondrial test (mtDNA) on 30 December 2011. The results of my mitochondrial lineage — Haplogroup L2a1l1b — just confirmed what I already knew about myself and the female ancestors in my family tree — our ancient origins/roots are in Africa!

As more genetic tests became available, my desire to know more about my ancestral roots prompted me to expand my results. So from 2011 to 2016, I completed the mtDNA Plus, Family Finder, mtFull Sequence, and Autosomal tests. With each test, I learned some amazing information about my lineage and ethnicity!

I’m 84% African. No surprises there!

I'm 84% Africa
Cameroon/Congo – 29%; Benin/Togo – 18%; Nigeria 13%; Mali – 12%; Ivory Coast/Ghana 9%

I’m 12% European. It was interesting to learn which areas of Europe are a part of my DNA!

I'm 12% European
Ireland – 6%; Scandinavia – 3%; Western Europe – 2%; Finland/Northwest Russia – 1%; Great Britain – <1%

Guess what?! I’m 2% Asian! Who knew?! – ROFL!!

I'm 2% Asian
Regions: Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan; Turkmenistan; Azerbaijan, Afghanistan

To every family member who told me that my great-great-grandmothers on both sides of my family tree were Native Americans (and I didn’t believe them), this one is for you!

I’m 1% Native American! So I guess those relatives who talked about having high cheekbones, being hairless with straight hair that is not exactly curly, kinky, or spirally may have been on to something here — LOL!

I'm 1% Native American

So, how will you celebrate National DNA Day? Feel free to celebrate with me here by sharing your Haplogroup and/or Ethnicity results in the comment section of this post if you like!

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun – My Genea-Bucket List

It’s Saturday Night Genealogy Fun with genealogy extraordinaire – Randy Seaver — and tonight’s mission, should I decide to accept it, is:

Knowing that a “Bucket List” is a wish list of things to do before death:

What is on your Genea-Bucket List?  What research locations do you want to visit?  Are there genea-people that you want to meet and share with?  What do you want to accomplish with your genealogy research?  List a minimum of three items – more if you want!”

My Genea-Bucket List consist of:

1. Attending and completing Boston University’s Online Genealogical Research Certificate Program, then seek certification through the Board for Certification of Genealogists.

2. According to recent mtDNA test results, my Haplogroup origin is Ghana. Therefore, I would love to travel to the Western Region of the Republic of Ghana where the Ahanta people that I descend from are located. I would especially like to visit during celebration and festival times . . . woo-hoo!

3. Publishing a historical fiction children’s picture book that I started a few years ago that tells the story of Quakertown — the removal of a thriving African-American community by 1923 to make way for a Civic Center Park in Denton, Texas.

Do you have a genea-bucket list? Feel free to share it with me!

 


Was April 2012 a great month for genealogists?

Month of AprilWas April 2012 a great month for genealogists? I truly believe it was! If nothing else, it was one of the BEST and most EXCITING months for me in the world of genealogy!

It began with the most anticipated genealogical event to date — the release of the 1940 United States Census on Monday, April 2, 2012 at 9 AM sharp Eastern Standard Time! Despite the overloaded databases the first few hours and days by so many genealogists trying to access these records, I’ve been able to successfully search the census records and find new and existing family members, as well as, identify those who went MIA in earlier records. But more importantly, these records have given me some great insight into how much my family and America has changed since the 1940s!

Next, Family History Expo 2012 rolled into H-town. With sessions like — “New Avenues in Genetic Genealogy,” “Google Earth for Genealogy – Rock Your Ancestor’s World,” and “The Challenges of Genealogical Research in Ghana” to name a few (you can see other sessions I attended via my online conference directory at Lanyrd.com), I came away with some excellent research techniques and best practices that will certainly enhance the accuracy of my genealogical investigation and much more.

Last, but certainly not least, the results of my genetic DNA test are in– woo-hoo! That’s right! The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) test that I ordered from Family Tree DNA during the first quarter of this year is back and I look forward to sharing those results with you in the coming weeks. Now, take one look at me and my family tree and it doesn’t take a genius to know that my ancestral origins are in Africa. But knowing more about the geographical region and the possible subculture groups that make up my ancestry is what makes genealogy via DNA so fascinating!

So . . . do you think April 2012 was a great month for genealogists? How successful were you in locating your ancestors in the 1940 Census when they were released last month? Have you tried DNA testing yet? What other genealogy activities did you delve into the month of April 2012? Share your thoughts with me!

It’s National DNA Day 2012!

DNA Day 2012

Well if you haven’t heard, it’s National DNA Day — a day for students, teachers, and the public (attention genealogists) to learn more about genetics and genomics!

This day commemorates the completion of the Human Genome Project in April 2003, and the discovery of DNA’s double helix. In celebration of this event, FamilyTreeDNA is offering a sale on their DNA test products. Nearly every test they offer will be on sale for three days and this includes upgrades to DNA tests that were not during last year’s sale! The sale begins on Thursday April 19, 2012 and will conclude at 11:59PM on Saturday April 21, 2012. There will be no need for a coupon – all prices will be automatically adjusted at the website.

Remember, all orders must be in and paid for by 11:59PM on Saturday April 21, 2012 to receive this offer! For more information about this special FamilyTreeDNA Sale and to order your Family Tree DNA Kit, visit http://www.familytreedna.com

Surname Saturday: My mtDNA Kit and Taylor Surname Project

mtDNA – Universal Female Test Kit

“Welcome to the exciting world of Genealogy by Genetics!” – was the opening line of the letter I received with my mtDNA Kit from FamilyTreeDNA.com. Well, I’m happy to report that my DNA samples are on their way back to their labs right now for processing – woo-hoo!

Before placing my online order for a kit, I was advised to search the website for a Surname Project for my last name, which may entitle me to a discount on my kit. A quick search revealed a Taylor Surname Project already in progress! So I received a great discount on my mtDNA Kit – YEAH! When my kit arrived it consisted of: 2 individually wrapped cheek scapers, 2 collection tubes, 1 release form, and 1 Family Tree DNA storage bag. The collection tubes, release form, and storage bag all have the same number that was assigned to me at the time I placed my order.

The DNA Collection process was very easy to follow. With clean hands, I opened one of the wrapped cheek scrapers and scraped forcefully the inside of my right cheek for about 60 seconds. Once I was done, I unscrewed the top of one of the collection tubes and pushed the scrapper inside by firmly pushing the plunger at the top of the scrapper which released it into the tube just under the liquid solution. Then I replaced the top back on the collection tube, twisting it tightly, to ensure the quality of my sample. Three hours later, I did the same thing again on the inside of my left cheek. Once I had both of my DNA samples and completed release form ready, I placed them in the storage bag which I sealed before placing everything in the padded envelope that came with my kit.

Visit Site

So why did I choose Family Tree DNA? According to reports I read:

Family DNA currently has the largest database that has helped many genealogists match and uncover common ancestors.

The genetic tests that they offer can determine relationships with a 99.9% degree of accuracy – which is why more and more people are testing with them today.

I like the fact that they will keep my DNA stored for 25 years at no charge!

They follow the most stringent guidelines for privacy – they control the DNA Database Library and test results, while the Arizona Research Labs located at the University of Arizona controls and maintains my genetic assets in a locked refrigerator on their behalf — as a double safety net!

Now that my DNA samples are on their way to their labs, it’s time for me to get connected with all the members of the Taylor Surname Project. So stay tuned, for there’s more information to come.  In the meantime,  feel free to explore my site and check out the surnames that are apart of my family history. And if by chance you have some Taylors from Texas in your family tree, let me hear from you because I’m . . . Claiming Kin!