Sunday’s Obituary: Mose Blanton (1871-1922)

Eagle Lake Headlight, November 18, 1922
Blanton, Mose
MOSE BLANTON BURIED SUNDAY

Mose Blanton, one of the respectable and old-time colored citizens of this community, died at his home near town last Saturday and was buried Sunday. Mose had many friends among the white folks here, and was one among the best of the colored citizens of the community.”

THANKS to the Colorado County TexGen Web Project, I was able to locate another Blanton obituary online . . . woo-hoo!

Mose Blanton is one of my great-grandmother Carrie’s older brothers. Though his obituary is short, I like that it focuses on the type of man my great-great uncle was at home and in his local community. As my mom likes to say, “there’s something to be said about the hand that raises you.” And in this case, the type of man Mose was in life was a reflection of the hand that raised him – Carey Blanton – http://claimingkin.com/sundays-obituary-carey-blanton/

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Source Citation

“Obituary of Mose Blanton,” Eagle Lake Headlight, Eagle Lake, Colorado County, Texas, Tuesday, November 18, 1922, Obituary section, available in print and available online at <http://www.txgenweb5.org/txcolorado/obits/obits_b/obitsb1b.htm#Blanton, Mose>, accessed 12 June 2011.

Sunday’s Obituary: Carey Blanton (1838-1891)

Colorado Citizen, August 27, 1891
Blanton, Carey
Eagle Lake Item

Carey Blanton, one of our best freedmen, died at his residence in town last Saturday night, after a long illness. Carey was an honest faithful and industrious darky and will be missed by the community.”

I truly appreciate Gina Hefferman, the Texas Archives State File Manager, and all the volunteers who donate their time transcribing records and contributing to the Texas USGen Web Project! As a result of their work, I was able to locate the obituary for my maternal great-great-grandfather – Carey Blanton – that appeared in a local county newspaper via the Colorado County TexGen Web Project where over 11,000 obituaries are now online!

Carey Blanton is my great-grandmother, Carrie’s father who was born into slavery around 1838, but died a Freedman on August 22, 1891 in Eagle Lake, Colorado Country, Texas.  Though the obituary above is not very flattering with regards to calling him an “industrious darky,”  – it is, what it is, and those were the times in which he lived. But despite the reference to his race and physical features, he was a man of “good character” and appreciated by those in the Eagle Lake community.

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Source Citation

“Obituary of Carey Blanton,” Colorado Citizen, Columbus, Colorado County, Texas, Tuesday, November 18, 1922, Eagle Lake Item section, available in print and available online at <http://www.txgenweb5.org/txcolorado/obits/obits_b/obitsb1b.htm#Blanton,%20Carey>, accessed 10 April 2011.

Sentimental Sunday: Carrie Blanton (1883-1944)

It’s Sentimental Sunday and this daily blogging prompt allows genealogy bloggers a chance to focus on a sentimental story or memory about an ancestor, or a wonderful family tradition.

Carrie [Blanton] Chappel

Carrie Blanton was born February 28, 1883 in Eagle Lake, Colorado County, Texas to Carey and Alice Bailey Blanton. Like her parents and eleven siblings, she grew up as a farm laborer. In addition to farming, Carrie was known as an excellent cook. I found her in the 1900 United States Federal Census working as a cook and servant for a lawyer and his wife, who ran a Boarding House, on Austin Street in Houston, Texas.

On June 2, 1902, Carrie gave birth to her first son, Joseph Chapple. On October 19, 1910, her second son, Lewis was born, but he died a month later from lung complications. I lost track of Carrie for a while, but by the mid-1920’s Carrie is listed as a widow living with her son, his wife Estella, and their children (Ella Louise, Joseph, Estella, and Carrie) in the greater 5th Ward community.

My mother, Carrie, wasn’t two years old when her mother died from Tuberculosis. On her death bed, Estella gave her four little children to her mother-in-law to raise as her own. So when Estella closed her eyes for the last time, she was able to do so knowing that her children were in the loving care of their grandmother. To better meet the needs of her grand babies, Carrie stopped working as a servant and cook and became a laundress which allowed her to work out of the home.

Carrie was a woman of high moral character who lived what she believed. She was a longtime member of Canaan Baptist Church and was the secretary that recorded the minutes when this church began at 2500 Altoona Street in Houston’s 5th Ward Community. She was highly respected by young and old, and was a true confidant and listener to those who needed someone to talk to. Folks loved talking to her because they didn’t have to worry that what they told her, would ever be repeated to anyone.

I never got a chance to know my Great-Grandmother Carrie, for she died on December 16, 1944 from heart failure, long before I was born. But, whenever I ask my mother about her, she smiles and proudly talks about what a great lady she was. But what I like hearing most from my mom was how she and her siblings thought Great-Grandmother Carrie needed a boyfriend — LOL! Whenever they would ask her why she didn’t have a boyfriend, she would take one look at them and say, “you stinky little heifers, go sit down and leave me alone!” The term “heifer” was about the extent of Carrie’s cursing. But, that didn’t deter them one bit because they took it upon themselves to find her a boyfriend anyway. The man they chose for her was — the traveling Charcoal Man — who traveled by wagon throughout the community selling charcoal. Visions of my great-grandmother dating the neighborhood “Charcoal Man” makes me chuckle! But what I respect most about her decision NOT to have a man around them while they were growing up was when she told them, “I don’t want your first experience with a man, to be a man that isn’t my husband or your grandfather.” Now those are the words of a great lady indeed!

If you have a — Carrie Blanton — falling out your family tree (especially if she’s a native Texan and lived in Houston) let me hear from you because –  I’m Claiming Kin!