Surname Saturday: My mtDNA Kit and Taylor Surname Project

“Welcome to the exciting world of Genealogy by Genetics!” – was the opening line of the letter I received with my mtDNA Kit from FamilyTreeDNA.com. Well, I’m happy to report that my DNA samples are on their way back to their labs right now for processing – woo-hoo!

Before placing my online order for a kit, I was advised to search the website for a Surname Project for my last name, which may entitle me to a discount on my kit. A quick search revealed a Taylor Surname Project already in progress! So I received a great discount on my mtDNA Kit – YEAH! When my kit arrived it consisted of: 2 individually wrapped cheek scapers, 2 collection tubes, 1 release form, and 1 Family Tree DNA storage bag. The collection tubes, release form, and storage bag all have the same number that was assigned to me at the time I placed my order.

The DNA Collection process was very easy to follow. With clean hands, I opened one of the wrapped cheek scrapers and scraped forcefully the inside of my right cheek for about 60 seconds. Once I was done, I unscrewed the top of one of the collection tubes and pushed the scrapper inside by firmly pushing the plunger at the top of the scrapper which released it into the tube just under the liquid solution. Then I replaced the top back on the collection tube, twisting it tightly, to ensure the quality of my sample. Three hours later, I did the same thing again on the inside of my left cheek. Once I had both of my DNA samples and completed release form ready, I placed them in the storage bag which I sealed before placing everything in the padded envelope that came with my kit.

So why did I choose Family Tree DNA? According to reports I read:

Family DNA currently has the largest database that has helped many genealogists match and uncover common ancestors.

The genetic tests that they offer can determine relationships with a 99.9% degree of accuracy – which is why more and more people are testing with them today.

I like the fact that they will keep my DNA stored for 25 years at no charge!

They follow the most stringent guidelines for privacy – they control the DNA Database Library and test results, while the Arizona Research Labs located at the University of Arizona controls and maintains my genetic assets in a locked refrigerator on their behalf — as a double safety net!

Now that my DNA samples are on their way to their labs, it’s time for me to get connected with all the members of the Taylor Surname Project. So stay tuned, for there’s more information to come.  In the meantime,  feel free to explore my site and check out the surnames that are apart of my family history. And if by chance you have some Taylors from Texas in your family tree, let me hear from you because I’m . . . Claiming Kin!

3 thoughts on “Surname Saturday: My mtDNA Kit and Taylor Surname Project

  1. Hi Liv:
    Is there a follow-up post to the results of your mtDNA test. My father has agreed to submitting his DNA for my genealogy journey and I was wondering what was the best place to get tested. Looking at your site has been helpful.

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    • Hi shelley@minkyadoo! Thanks for checking out my mtDNA post. I have not posted a follow-up just yet. That’s simply because after getting my results, I really needed to do some more research about my maternal females that my results come from. This hasn’t been an easy task because my mother’s mom died when she was 2 yrs old and was raised by her father’s mother and family. So she never really knew her mom’s family. So everything that I have discovered about that limb of my tree has been through collateral and cluster research. I’ve recently made a breakthrough that I will be blogging about in the coming months. So doing this test has helped. FamilyTreeDNA’s database also came back with the contact information of a relative who has exact mtDNA as mine as well. . . . woo-hoo!

      I tried FamilyTreeDNA first because it is based here in Houston. It is actually just up the freeway from my office. But I also want to have another test done via Ancestry too in the coming weeks (which folks are recommending along with a test at 23andMe.com too). Why 3 test? Experts say that each test gives you different perspectives on your DNA. What has helped me learn more about genetic genealogy and to have a place to ask a lot of questions is the couple of groups I’ve joined which I recommend to you as well since you are about to explore this field. Check out the DNA-NEWBIE list by the International Society of Genetic Genealogy – http://groups.yahoo.com/group/DNA-NEWBIE/
      And if you join this group (which I recommend you do, be sure to set your membership to digest version because that list produces a lot of email) you must also join the society’s newsletter which doesn’t send you a lot of emails like the newbie one – http://groups.yahoo.com/group/isoggnewsletter/

      But I will be picking up where this post left off last year by this summer. I cannot wait to share my findings and more about a new relative that shares my mtDNA in Lafayette, Mississippi! Again, thanks for letting me know you are considering DNA testing with your research!

      Like

  2. Pingback: Claiming Kin » Blog Archive » Was April 2012 a great month for genealogist?

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